Uveitis
Uveitis is an inflammation of the eye's structures responsible for its blood supply. The structures, called the uveal tract, include the iris, ciliary body and choroid. There are three major types of uveitis, each classified by the structures it affects.

1. Anterior uveitis (also known as iridocyclitis) is the most common form of uveitis and affects the iris and ciliary body. It is characterized by symptoms including light sensitivity, blurred vision, redness, pain, small pupil and tearing.

2. Posterior uveitis (also known as retinitis or chorioretinitis) involves the retina and choroid. Blurred vision and floaters are the most common symptoms.

3. Pan uveitis affects structures in both the front and back of the eye. It can present with any combination of symptoms experienced with the other forms of uveitis.

Treatment for the different forms of uveitis is dependent on the severity of the disease and the ocular structures involved. Generally, topical eye drops and oral medications are prescribed to reduce the inflammation. In some cases, medicine that reduces intraocular pressure is used. After the inflammation has been treated, the eye should be evaluated for secondary conditions, such as scar tissue, cataracts or glaucoma. Many patients must also be evaluated for underlying systemic